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Recruiting Station Twin Cities

 

Recruiting Station Twin Cities

Midwest Marines

Fort Snelling, Minn.
The outgoing commanding officer, Col. Jason L. Morris, and incoming commanding officer, Col. David M. Fallon, pose for a photo with the Western Recruiting Region commanding general, Brig. Gen. William Jurney, during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
The outgoing commanding officer, Col. Jason L. Morris, and incoming commanding officer, Col. David M. Fallon, pose for a photo with the Western Recruiting Region commanding general, Brig. Gen. William Jurney, during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The 9th Marine Corps District color guard prepares to march on the colors during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony where Col. Jason L. Morris relinquished command to Col. David M. Fallon, aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
The 9th Marine Corps District color guard prepares to march on the colors during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony where Col. Jason L. Morris relinquished command to Col. David M. Fallon, aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The outgoing commanding officer, Col. Jason Morris, and the incoming commanding officer, Col. David Fallon, exchange the passing of the colors during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
The outgoing commanding officer, Col. Jason Morris, and the incoming commanding officer, Col. David Fallon, exchange the passing of the colors during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The outgoing commanding officer addresses service member, families and friends during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
The outgoing commanding officer addresses service member, families and friends during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The incoming commanding officer, Col. David M. Fallon, addresses service member, families and friends during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
The incoming commanding officer, Col. David M. Fallon, addresses service member, families and friends during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill., on July 7, 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Marines stand in formation during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill. July 7, 2017, where Col. Jason L. Morris relinquished command to Col. David M. Fallon. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Change of Command
Marines stand in formation during the 9MCD Change of Command ceremony aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, Ill. July 7, 2017, where Col. Jason L. Morris relinquished command to Col. David M. Fallon. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The 9th Marine Corps District hosted its Family Readiness Conference aboard Fort Snelling, Minnesota, at the Naval Reserve Training Center, June 20-23, 2017. The Family Readiness Program serves as the primary communication link between the command and families of 9th Marine Corps District. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Family Readiness Conference
The 9th Marine Corps District hosted its Family Readiness Conference aboard Fort Snelling, Minnesota, at the Naval Reserve Training Center, June 20-23, 2017. The Family Readiness Program serves as the primary communication link between the command and families of 9th Marine Corps District. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The 2nd Marine Division Band from Camp Lejeune, N.C., performs at Overman Park during the Sturgis Falls Celebration in Cedar Falls, Iowa, June 24, 2017. The band presence helps the recruiting efforts in the Midwest, including the Musician Enlisted Option Program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Sound of Freedom
The 2nd Marine Division Band from Camp Lejeune, N.C., performs at Overman Park during the Sturgis Falls Celebration in Cedar Falls, Iowa, June 24, 2017. The band presence helps the recruiting efforts in the Midwest, including the Musician Enlisted Option Program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
The 2nd Marine Division Band from Camp Lejeune, N.C., performs at Overman Park during the Sturgis Falls Celebration in Cedar Falls, Iowa, June 24, 2017. The band presence helps the recruiting efforts in the Midwest, including the Musician Enlisted Option Program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Sound of Chaos
The 2nd Marine Division Band from Camp Lejeune, N.C., performs at Overman Park during the Sturgis Falls Celebration in Cedar Falls, Iowa, June 24, 2017. The band presence helps the recruiting efforts in the Midwest, including the Musician Enlisted Option Program. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Jennifer Webster/Released)
Marines from Recruiting Station St. Louis pass the command organizational colors during a change of command ceremony at Marine Corps Recruiting Station St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. on June 23, 2017. Major Nicole Bastian took command of the recruiting station relieving Maj. Ian Duncan. (USMC Photo by Cpl. Zachery B. Martin)
St. Louis Change of Command
Marines from Recruiting Station St. Louis pass the command organizational colors during a change of command ceremony at Marine Corps Recruiting Station St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. on June 23, 2017. Major Nicole Bastian took command of the recruiting station relieving Maj. Ian Duncan. (USMC Photo by Cpl. Zachery B. Martin)
Marines from Recruiting Station St. Louis pass the command organizational colors during a change of command ceremony at Marine Corps Recruiting Station St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. on June 23, 2017. Major Nicole Bastian took command of the recruiting station relieving Maj. Ian Duncan. (USMC Photo by Cpl. Zachery B. Martin)
St. Louis Change of Command
Marines from Recruiting Station St. Louis pass the command organizational colors during a change of command ceremony at Marine Corps Recruiting Station St. Louis, St. Louis, Mo. on June 23, 2017. Major Nicole Bastian took command of the recruiting station relieving Maj. Ian Duncan. (USMC Photo by Cpl. Zachery B. Martin)
Two Marines with the 9th Marine Corps District, based out of Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, were on hand to honor four Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Two Marines with the 9th Marine Corps District, based out of Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, were on hand to honor four Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Archibald Mosley gives a speech after receiving a Congressional Gold Medal memento for Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. Mosley is one of four Montford Point Marines from Colp. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Archibald Mosley gives a speech after receiving a Congressional Gold Medal memento for Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. Mosley is one of four Montford Point Marines from Colp. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Jim Gentile, the project liaison for the Colp Plaza Veterans Memorial Committee, gives a speech to guests, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. The speech honored fallen service members and four African American Marines from Colp, who were among the first black Americans to join Marine Corps during World War II. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Jim Gentile, the project liaison for the Colp Plaza Veterans Memorial Committee, gives a speech to guests, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. The speech honored fallen service members and four African American Marines from Colp, who were among the first black Americans to join Marine Corps during World War II. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Two Marines with the 9th Marine Corps District, based out of Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, were on hand to honor four Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Two Marines with the 9th Marine Corps District, based out of Naval Station Great Lakes, Illinois, were on hand to honor four Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Archibald Mosley reads a Congressional Gold Medal memento for Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. Mosley is one of four Montford Point Marines from Colp. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Archibald Mosley reads a Congressional Gold Medal memento for Montford Point Marines, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. Mosley is one of four Montford Point Marines from Colp. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Jim Gentile, the project liaison for the Colp Plaza Veterans Memorial Committee, gives a speech to guests, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. The speech honored fallen service members and four African American Marines from Colp, who were among the first black Americans to join Marine Corps during World War II. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Marines honor Montford Point Marines, service members in small southern Illinois town
Jim Gentile, the project liaison for the Colp Plaza Veterans Memorial Committee, gives a speech to guests, May 27, at the Colp Area Veterans Celebration, Dedication and Remembrance Ceremony, in Colp, Illinois. The speech honored fallen service members and four African American Marines from Colp, who were among the first black Americans to join Marine Corps during World War II. Nearly 20,000 African-Americans joined the Marine Corps in 1942, after President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued a “presidential directive giving African Americans an opportunity to be recruited in the Marine Corps,” according to the Montford Point Marines Association website. They didn’t receive recruit training at San Diego or Parris Island, however, but Camp Montford Point, N.C., a segregated training site for African American Marine recruits. For the next seven years, the camp remained opened until it became desegregated. The four Marines are Sol Griffin, Jr.; James L. Kirby, Early Taylor, Jr. and Archibald Mosley. These Marines, among many other Montford Point Marines across the country, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award that can be given to a civilian by Congress, in 2012. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Gunnery Sgt. Bryan A. Peterson)
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.
Marine leader speaks about values Marines, wrestlers share at NWCA leadership academy
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.
Marine leader speaks about values Marines, wrestlers share at NWCA leadership academy
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.
Marine leader speaks about values Marines, wrestlers share at NWCA leadership academy
Colonel Jason Morris speaks to a group of university wrestling coaches and leaders, today, about the values Marines and wrestlers share during the NWCA leadership academy in Edwardsville, Illinois. He talked about the three missions of the U.S. Marine Corps - make Marines, win our nation’s battles and develop quality citizens - and spoke about how to adapt them so the coaches in attendance could grow wrestling. His speech focused on how training is the most important part of a leader’s job, whether it is preparing a team for battle or the wrestling mat.

The mission of the 9th Marine Corps District is to supervise and administer the enlisted and officer procurement programs of the Regular and Reserve establishment and to perform such other tasks as may be directed by the Commandant of the Marine Corps.  

The 9th District maintains eight recruiting stations, 96 recruiting substations, 139 permanent contact stations, 10 transient recruiting facilities, and 11 officer selection offices.

The District spans 12 states across the nation's upper Midwest.

Midwest Marines are responsible for U.S. Marine Corps recruiting efforts in the upper Midwest, including the states of Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North and South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana and Oklahoma. Midwest Marines are headquartered aboard Naval Station Great Lakes, IL. We are formally known as the 9th Marine Corps District.